Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)

An esophagogastroduodenoscopy, or EGD, is a procedure that can evaluate the upper gastrointestinal tract post surgery and detects cancer. It is performed on patients who show symptoms such as persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, difficulty swallowing, heartburn or reflux (GERD).

 

Doctors use a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope. An endoscope is fed gently down the throat and takes images of the esophagus lining, the stomach, and the upper intestinal tract. This allows your doctor to check for possible ailments and establish the best treatment options.

 

The purpose

 

An esophagogastroduodenoscopy, or EGD, is performed on patients who show symptoms such as persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, difficulty swallowing or heartburn. The procedure will evaluate the upper gastrointestinal tract post-surgery and detect cancer. Doctors use a thin, flexible tube called an endoscope to examine the esophagus, stomach and duodenum, or the first part of the small intestine.

 

Prepare for the procedure

 

For the safest examination and the best results, patients should come in for their EGD with an empty stomach. No food or drinks should be consumed within eight hours of your procedure. Inform your doctor of your medications, both prescription and over-the-counter. Due to the procedure, your typical dose may need to be temporarily changed. Also, inform your doctor of any medications you are allergic to or any medical conditions.

 

What to expect

 

An endoscope is fed gently down the throat and takes images of the esophagus lining, the stomach, and the upper intestinal tract to check for possible ailments in order to establish the best treatment options. A sedative will be administered to the patient to relax the patient. Your breathing will not be affected. Many fall asleep during the procedure.

 

After the procedure

 

The EGD is an out-patient procedure, but, due to the sedatives, patients will need someone to drive them home from the medical office. Patients are allowed to eat after the procedure unless the doctor tells them otherwise. Your throat may be sore and you may feel some bloating because of the air introduced to your stomach from the endoscope.

 

Your doctor will give you the results following your EGD; however, biopsy results will need to be sent to the lab, meaning those typically will not be given to you on the same day as your procedure.

The information AGH supplies on this website should not be used as a substitute to your regular physician’s medical advice. Your research from this website should not be used as a medical diagnosis. Consult your regular physician for diagnoses and treatments. The information found on this website is for educational purposes only. A formal consultation with a surgeon or doctor is needed before pursuing surgical procedures or medical treatments. Individual results may vary.