1. Understanding Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    Acid reflux is a very common occurrence. Many people experience this from time to time, and it generally brings no other side effects besides mild discomfort. However, chronic and persistent instances of acid reflux can point to gastroesophageal reflux disease, in which discomfort and irritation become common. In this post, we will be going over some of the various aspects of acid reflux and GERD,…Read More

  2. Understanding Lactose Intolerance

    Have you been feeling off after eating certain foods? Are common food items such as milk and cheese causing discomfort that is hard to discuss or reveal to others? If this has become a persistent issue, chances are that you could have a lactose intolerance issue. Read on to learn more about lactose intolerance and how it can affect you, and be sure to contact AGH of Greater Washington to gather ex…Read More

  3. Understanding Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Lately, you’ve been feeling a little off. It isn’t noticeable to the outside world, but you are noticing it personally throughout daily activities. Because this has been going on for a long time, you realize that something is wrong and won’t just subside on its own. If this is resonating with you, there is a possibility that you are experiencing Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Read on to lea…Read More

  4. Understanding Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    What is flexible sigmoidoscopy? Flexible sigmoidoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the rectum and a portion of the colon (large intestine) by inserting a flexible tube about the thickness of your finger into the anus and slowly advancing it into the rectum and lower part of the colon. What preparation is required? Your doctor will tell you what cleansing routine to use. In general, prep…Read More

  5. Understanding Esophageal Dilation

    What is esophageal dilation? Esophageal dilation is a procedure that allows your doctor to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed area of your esophagus [swallowing tube]. Doctors can use various techniques for this procedure. Your doctor might perform the procedure as part of a sedated endoscopy. Alternatively, your doctor might apply a local anesthetic spray to the back of your throat and then pass a we…Read More

  6. Understanding Capsule Endoscopy

    What is capsule endoscopy? Capsule endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum). Your doctor will give you a pill-sized video camera for you to swallow. This camera has its own light source and takes pictures of your small intestine as it passes through. These …Read More

  7. Understanding Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    What is a PEG? PEG stands for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, a procedure in which a flexible feeding tube is placed through the abdominal wall and into the stomach. PEG allows nutrition, fluids and/or medications to be put directly into the stomach, bypassing the mouth and esophagus. This brochure will give you a basic understanding of the procedure-how it is performed, how it can help, and …Read More

  8. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    The Benefits of Endoscopy Endoscopy involves the use of flexible tubes, known as endoscopes, to provide a close-up, color television view of the inside of the digestive tract. Upper endoscopes are passed through the mouth to visualize the esophagus (food pipe), stomach, and duodenum (first portion of the small intestine), while lower endoscopes (colonoscopes) are passed through the rectum to view …Read More

  9. Understanding Diverticulosis

    What is diverticulosis? Diverticulosis is a condition in which there are small pouches or pockets in the wall or lining of any portion of the digestive tract. These pockets occur when the inner layer of the digestive tract pushes through weak spots in the outer layer. A single pouch is called a diverticulum. The pouches associated with diverticulosis are most often located in the lower part of the…Read More

  10. Understanding Esophageal Testing (or Manometry)

    What is esophageal testing, also called manometry, and why is it performed? Esophageal testing or manometry measures the pressures and the pattern of muscle contractions in your esophagus. Abnormalities in the contractions and strength of the muscle or in the sphincter at the lower end of the esophagus can result in pain, heartburn, and/or difficulty swallowing. Esophageal manometry is the test us…Read More