1. Understanding Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    What is flexible sigmoidoscopy? Flexible sigmoidoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the rectum and a portion of the colon (large intestine) by inserting a flexible tube about the thickness of your finger into the anus and slowly advancing it into the rectum and lower part of the colon. Wha…Read More

  2. Understanding Colon Polyps and Their Treatment

    What is a colon polyp? Polyps are benign growths (noncancerous tumors or neoplasms) involving the lining of the bowel. They can occur in several locations in the gastrointestinal tract but are most common in the colon. They vary in size from less than a quarter of an inch to several inches in diamet…Read More

  3. Understanding Esophageal Dilation

    What is esophageal dilation? Esophageal dilation is a procedure that allows your doctor to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed area of your esophagus [swallowing tube]. Doctors can use various techniques for this procedure. Your doctor might perform the procedure as part of a sedated endoscopy. Alternati…Read More

  4. Understanding Capsule Endoscopy

    What is capsule endoscopy? Capsule endoscopy lets your doctor examine the lining of the middle part of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes the three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum). Your doctor will give you a pill-sized video camera for you to swallow. This cam…Read More

  5. Understanding Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    What is a PEG? PEG stands for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, a procedure in which a flexible feeding tube is placed through the abdominal wall and into the stomach. PEG allows nutrition, fluids and/or medications to be put directly into the stomach, bypassing the mouth and esophagus. This broc…Read More

  6. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    The Benefits of Endoscopy Endoscopy involves the use of flexible tubes, known as endoscopes, to provide a close-up, color television view of the inside of the digestive tract. Upper endoscopes are passed through the mouth to visualize the esophagus (food pipe), stomach, and duodenum (first portion o…Read More

  7. Understanding Diverticulosis

    What is diverticulosis? Diverticulosis is a condition in which there are small pouches or pockets in the wall or lining of any portion of the digestive tract. These pockets occur when the inner layer of the digestive tract pushes through weak spots in the outer layer. A single pouch is called a dive…Read More

  8. Understanding Esophageal Testing (or Manometry)

    What is esophageal testing, also called manometry, and why is it performed? Esophageal testing or manometry measures the pressures and the pattern of muscle contractions in your esophagus. Abnormalities in the contractions and strength of the muscle or in the sphincter at the lower end of the esopha…Read More

  9. Understanding Minor Rectal Bleeding

    Minor rectal bleeding refers to the passage of a few drops of bright red (fresh) blood from the rectum, which may appear on the stool, on the toilet paper or in the toilet bowl. This brochure addresses minor rectal bleeding that occurs from time to time. Continuous passage of significantly greater a…Read More

  10. ERCP

    What is ERCP? Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography, or ERCP, is a specialized technique used to study the bile ducts, pancreatic duct and gallbladder. Ducts are drainage routes; the drainage channels from the liver are called bile or biliary ducts. The pancreatic duct is the drainage chan…Read More